A diary of a blonde

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  • 21st October
    2014
  • 21
directedbychuckjones:

Model sheet for “Kiss Me Cat” directed by Chuck Jones and released on February 21, 1953 in theaters nationwide. Story by Michael Maltese; animation by Lloyd Vaughn, Ken Harris, and Ben Washam; layouts by Maurice Noble; backgrounds by Philip DeGuard; voice characterizations by Mel Blanc and Bea Benaderet; musical direction by Carl W. Stalling.  

directedbychuckjones:

Model sheet for “Kiss Me Cat” directed by Chuck Jones and released on February 21, 1953 in theaters nationwide. Story by Michael Maltese; animation by Lloyd Vaughn, Ken Harris, and Ben Washam; layouts by Maurice Noble; backgrounds by Philip DeGuard; voice characterizations by Mel Blanc and Bea Benaderet; musical direction by Carl W. Stalling.  

  • 21st October
    2014
  • 21
beforeandafterweightloss:

little-ally-bird submitted:
Hi!So, I’ve already submitted here before, but I’m back with more recent after pics.
Height: 5’7Before (April 2014): 160 lbsAfter (August 2014): 125-130 lbs
It took me about 4 months to lose the 30 lbs + baby muscles (as you can see on my arms) and it was all done by changing my diet and taking up running again. It was that simple.
message me here with any questions or comments! :)

    —- SUBMIT your own Before and After weight-loss photos HERE. 

beforeandafterweightloss:

 submitted:

Hi!

So, I’ve already submitted here before, but I’m back with more recent after pics.

Height: 5’7
Before (April 2014): 160 lbs
After (August 2014): 125-130 lbs

It took me about 4 months to lose the 30 lbs + baby muscles (as you can see on my arms) and it was all done by changing my diet and taking up running again. It was that simple.

message me here with any questions or comments! :)

    —- SUBMIT your own Before and After weight-loss photos HERE. 

  • 20th October
    2014
  • 20
  • 20th October
    2014
  • 20

This is how you lose her.

You lose her when you forget to remember the little things that mean the world to her: the sincerity in a stranger’s voice during a trip to the grocery, the delight of finding something lost or forgotten like a sticker from when she was five, the selflessness of a child giving a part of his meal to another, the scent of new books in the store, the surprise short but honest notes she tucks in her journal and others you could only see if you look closely.

You must remember when she forgets.

You lose her when you don’t notice that she notices everything about you: your use of the proper punctuation that tells her continuation rather than finality, your silence when you’re about to ask a question but you think anything you’re about to say to her would be silly, your mindless humming when it is too quiet, your handwriting when you sign your name in blank sheets of paper, your muted laughter when you are trying to be polite, and more and more of what you are, which you don’t even know about yourself, because she pays attention.

She remembers when you forget.

You lose her for every second you make her feel less and less of the beauty that she is. When you make her feel that she is replaceable. She wants to feel cherished. When you make her feel that you are fleeting. She wants you to stay. When you make her feel inadequate. She wants to know that she is enough and she does not need to change for you, nor for anyone else because she is she and she is beautiful, kind and good.

You must learn her.

You must know the reason why she is silent. You must trace her weakest spots. You must write to her. You must remind her that you are there. You must know how long it takes for her to give up. You must be there to hold her when she is about to.

You must love her because many have tried and failed. And she wants to know that she is worthy to be loved, that she is worthy to be kept.

And, this is how you keep her

This Is How You Lose Her || Junot Diaz    (via 5000letters)

(via 5000letters)

  • 20th October
    2014
  • 20
  • 20th October
    2014
  • 20
You live like this, sheltered, in a delicate world, and you believe you are living. Then you read a book, or you take a trip, and you discover you are not living, that you are hibernating. The symptoms of hibernating are easily detectable: first, restlessness. The second symptom (when hibernating becomes dangerous and might degenerate into death): absence of pleasure. That is all. It appears like an innocuous illness. Monotony, boredom, death. Millions live like this (or die like this) without knowing it. They work in offices. They drive a car. They picnic with their families. They raise children. And then some shock treatment takes place, a person, a book, a song, and it awakens them and saves them from death. Some never awaken.
Anaïs Nin (via rasputinmaxim)

(via lil-indy)

  • 20th October
    2014
  • 20